Roy Choi: Everyone wants the answer. They want us to have the solution.

Everyone wants the answer.  They want us to have the solution.  But we don’t have a solution.  We’re just trying to feed and take care of people.  If we’re not perfect at the beginning, well, fuck it,man.  We’re a year old.  Give it time. – Roy Choi

Sometimes an east coast person will come west and try (food, restaurants, and so forth) and report negatively on it.  Probably missing some context or perhaps from their perspective, accurately depicting their opinions.  Recently Pete Wells of the New York Times gave Roy Choi’s LocoL zero stars.  And while I don’t know what exactly that means out of a general ignorance of the New York Times restaurant reviewing standards, I feel like saying “zero stars” suggests some colossal failure and reflects negatively on the food and experience in general.

For example, if I gave a restaurant two stars on Yelp, that would probably suggest I never intended to return again.  A one star review suggests the chef acted deplorably to the food.  I don’t know if it’s possible to give zero stars on Yelp, but that’s probably what I would give to the site of a zombie outbreak.

I see from the LocoL website that the menu has changed since I last visited them.  Probably gives me a reason to go back and try things.  I don’t remember the food being bad, just … not what I wanted.  But I remain curious and I hope them success, and perhaps in the future the New York Times will write on them in such a fashion that highlights the good work LocoL is doing for and with the community.

What gets NY Times Restaurant Reviews Three stars and recommendations?  Gramercy Tavern. Four $$$$.  Does this help the people?  No.  Will I ever go there?  Unlikely.  Is there a point in reviewing expensive New American restaurant?  Perhaps, but it’s easy to make the point that both exist for different goals and with different ways of achieving each and that by treating them the same benefits one and keeps one at a disadvantage.

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